Margaret Jaeger

Margaret Jaeger
Ihad always done needlework – been knitting forever – but it wasn’t until the American Bicentennial when I saw someone making yarn on a spinning wheel that I discovered spinning was not in fact a lost art and, moreover, that was what I was supposed to be doing. It was an instant recognition and connection. I enjoy the connection with the past – the art of spinning is well over 10,000 years old, as well as, the connection with other cultures – I have lived in Africa and south Asia and observed the traditional textile arts of spinning and weaving still practiced there. I have recently begun weaving as well, and I find great satisfaction and peace working with my hands and manipulating the tools of my craft. It’s very meditative and therapeutic to feel fiber pass through my fingers and see lengthening thread wind onto the bobbin, to pass the shuttle back and forth across the loom and watch fabric grow, to wrap yarn around my knitting needles and create intricate lace.

I handspin all of the yarn for my knitting, using various wool, silk, alpaca, yak, cotton, and flax fibers. I use some commercial produced threads and yarns in my weaving in addition to handspun, but still employ natural animal and plant fibers.

 

It’s very meditative and therapeutic to feel fiber pass through my fingers and see lengthening thread wind onto the bobbin

Mary's shawl1 lace image RCGSpinning2-150x150 3-150x150 4-150x150